Tag Archives: Kathryne Ellis

Wrap Up: What’s In Your Pantry?

Hi Everyone,

We had a great event on Monday night in the Casino Ballroom. Five extremely knowledgeable women spoke about nutrition with very different approaches. Nutrition is one of my passions and one of the reasons is because nutrition is not one size fits all. This panel proved that; we had registered dietitians, nutritionists, health coaches, vegans, and meat eaters for example. Here is the best wrap up I could give for those not there, the information was too good not to share with all of you.

Enjoy!

Tracey                                                                                                                                                  

The first speaker was Debra Dobies, RD. She has an extensive background in the field of nutrition and very valuable information to share.

She spoke about how to grocery shop to eat healthy. She recommends 3 things when grocery shopping.
1. Bring a list and stick to it
2. Don’t go food shopping hungry
3. Shop the perimeter of the store

The healthiest foods are found not in the center aisles, but around the outside of the store. If you think about the set up of a grocery store, think about what you find in those middle aisles, not really anything your body needs. (and no your body does not NEED oreos or cheetos)

She also spoke about the importance of knowing what is on your food when you buy it concerning produce. The grocery store has no seasons, you can buy kiwi and strawberries year round which was unheard of years ago. When we import a lot of produce from other countries, it is important to realize that those countries have their own regulations when it comes to pesticides. For example, Chili still allows pesticides to be used that we banned in the USA. Debra recommends buying local when possible, buying organic for the produce on the dirty dozen list(posted below), and buy frozen because you know you are getting more nutrients then something that has been picked and traveled thousands of miles.

Kim Belanger spoke next about her work in teaching people how to eat, particularly when it comes to portion sizes. She had great hand outs that sum up her talk that I will post below. She had examples of portion sizes for the different kinds of foods we eat. You would truly be shocked to realize how small the appropriate portion size is. She also mentioned eating the least processed foods- you can tell this by checking the ingredients list. When a food is highly processed it will have a ton of ingredients, as well as many foods you can not pronounce. Stick with ingredient lists of no more than 5 foods and only words that you can pronounce. She stressed the importance of bringing awareness to what we are eating.

Sarah Lockenmeyer spoke next about being a vegan, but she likes to calls herself one who eats a plant based diet. Sarah has been eating this way since the age of 16 and appropriately wore a shirt that said, “Eat Kale, Not Cow.” Eating a plant based diet is something Sarah is clearly passionate about. She spoke about how cancer can not grow in an alkaline environment which is the PH your body’s blood will have eating mostly plants vs. more animal products. Sarah also has a great philosophy for those new to being a vegan– crowd new foods in, while crowding old foods out. It is important to realize that your body is an amazing machine that forms to what you feed it. If you feed it dirt, your body will figure out a way to make it work. When you eat animal products, your insides are actually different than when you eat a plant based diet. You body can not make this transition over night, so one must gradually change to this eating lifestyle.

Kathryne Ellis spoke next and I must be honest and say that Kathryne’s view on food closely matched my own. Kathrynne’s talk was really about asking YOURSELF what is best for YOUR body? Don’t worry about eating for a trend or what someone else eats. If you aren’t feeling well try reflecting on your diet. If you feel great, pay attention to what you are eating and keep going. If you are tired, suffer from digestive issues, or headaches frequently, don’t underestimate the importance of your diet and making food work the best it can for your body. Kathryne will be joining GCU again in the spring time, Jan. 31st at 5:30 to give a talk on weight loss and healthy eating.

Last, Sachiko Komagata spoke about nutrition in her life. Being born in Japan, Sachiko grew up eating a traditional Japanese diet. When she came to America, she noticed how sweet the food was here compared to her home land of Japan. She also noticed how other people who come from other countries healthy, then become sick after they live here for a while. She realized there had to be something about what she was doing in Japan so she is lucky to have care packages sent of different foods native to Japan like seaweed and shiitake mushrooms. She recommends looking in Asian Markets for the foods she brought in as samples. Sachiko’s talk brought up an interesting idea that I am currently learning more about for my research project, which is the idea that we should eat foods that are similar to those of our ancestors. The theory is we all have digestive enzymes to digest foods from where we are from easier than others.

Below are the hand outs given out by Kim and Debra. They are not the best quality since some of the information was cut off in the scanner. If you are interested in getting one of the hand outs, I would recommend reaching out to Sachiko Komagata who can then put you in touch with the appropriate person.

If you have any questions or are interested in speaking with any of the presenters, please leave your comments below and we can do our best to make that happen.








What’s On Your Plate and In Your Pantry/Refrigerator?

Nutrition Panel Discussion



Nov. 14, 2011 

5:30 – 7pm

Casino Ballroom

Panel members

Debra Dobies, RD                                                                                      

Kim Belanger                            

Sarah Lockenmeyer

Kathryne Ellis                                                                          

Sachiko Komagata

 

This panel discussion program will emphasize what healthy foods, herbs, & spices to purchase to build a healthy kitchen to attain/maintain wellness.  The program participants should stress positive choices in

  • Staples for the Pantry
  • Navigating the Grocery Store for Wellness
  • Important foods to eliminate from the diet
  • Importance of alkalinity in the body
  • Benefits of a plant based diet and some steps to get started
  • Typical Japanese (or Asian) pantry/ref for Wellness
  • Food that don’t support wellness/health
  • Portion control and my plate with food models & healthy breakfast plate
  • Recipes 

Panel Mini Bio

Debra A. Dobies, RD, MA, LDN –  Debra has over 30 years’ experience as a Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist. Debra attended Rutgers College where she received her Bachelor’s degree in Human Nutrition & Foods followed by a Clinical Dietetic Internship at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit Michigan. She also attended GCU and earned her MA in Holistic Health. Her work experience include serving as an inpatient and outpatient dietitian, health educator, Director of a hospital Food & Nutrition department and was the clinical advisor for an outpatient weight management program. Debra maintains a private practice and conducts classes, speeches and programs for healthcare, corporate and community groups. She has appeared on several television shows, radio broadcasts and featured in newspapers on various nutrition topics.  One of  Debra’s favorite quotes is “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are.” (~ G. K. Chesterton)

Sarah Jane Lockenmeyer – Sarah is a holistic health coach currently practicing in Monmouth and Ocean County. She uses a mind, body, soul approach to both educate on proper nutrition and repair the relationship with foods. She believes in a primarily whole foods, plant based diet along with nourishing the spirit. Sarah Jane received her certification from The Institute of Integrative Nutrition, NYC and is currently enrolled in the Holistic Health program at Georgian Court University.

Sachiko Komagata, PT, Ph.D. – Sachiko is a consumer of food and food-like substances over the past half century. Her dietary habits were formed through Japanese tradition that originated in the continental Chinese and Korean traditions and as an adult immigrant to the US she has experienced American Standard Diet (SAD) with many questions and consequences.  She teaches/introduces Japanese, Asian food choices, such as sushi cooking whenever she can on campus as well as outside. After over a decade of physical therapy practice along with some part time teaching in graduate professional schools in the Philadelphia region, she began teaching both undergraduate and graduate courses in Holistic Health at Georgian Court University.  She currently serves as the Chair of the Department of Holistic Health and Exercise Science.  She also teaches Japanese culture, Japanese calligraphy as a mindfulness practice, complementary and alternative approaches to wellness, etc. as non-degree program at McAuley Institute for Lifelong Learning (MILL).

Kathryne Ellis MA, CN.  Kathryne Ellis is a certified nutritionist, homeopath, and holistic health practitioner who has been in private practice for over 17 years. She supports health and well-being from a biopsychosocial perspective. In order to support the needs of each person, she looks at a multitude of stressors that may contribute to physical, emotional, or spiritual imbalances. In doing so, she addresses diet, lifestyle, health status, and behaviors, thus addressing both acute and chronic health concerns. She received her undergraduate degree in Social Work from Monmouth College and her Master’s from Georgian Court University in Holistic Health Studies. She received her nutritional education and certification from the American Health Science University. She is currently working on her dissertation for her doctorate from Walden University in Health and Human Behavior.

Kimberly Belanger, Cand. MA – She is currently working as a Program Nutritionist for the Ocean County Health Department WIC Program.  Kim attended the College of Saint Elizabeth where she received her Bachelor’s degree in Foods and Nutrition. She currently provides nutrition education and counseling for low income families.  Her target population is pregnant women, breastfeeding women, and children up to the age of five.  She also has experience in hospital based dietetics where she worked as a Dietetic Technician.  Kim has followed a vegan diet for nine years and has experience working in health food stores and vegan restaurants.  Her goal is to be able to provide her clients with cost-effective diet plans while still incorporating nutritionally dense and unprocessed food options.  Kim is attending Georgian Court University and is working towards her Masters in Holistic Health.